FAQs

What is a SCITT?

Ripley TSA SCITT is our legal name as a provider of Initial Teacher Training (ITT). SCITT stands for School Centred Initial Teacher Training. It means that we are able to confer the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and that we can train teachers in our schools and it is therefore an alternative to a university ITT course.

What is QTS?

QTS stands for Qualified Teacher Status, and this is the qualification you need to teach in state schools in England.

What is PGCE?

PGCE stands for Postgraduate/Professional Graduate Certificate in Education. This is an academic award which universities award alongside QTS. It is the academic, theoretical study which is taught by a university on an ITT programme. Only a university can offer this award, as they have degree awarding powers. On our programme we will be working with Leeds Beckett University so that our trainees can gain the professional award of PGCE alongside their QTS award. However, we are able to offer QTS-only for a reduced fee for interested candidates.

How does the Ripley TSA SCITT differ from a university PGCE?

On the Ripley TSA SCITT your training is led by our school partnership, so our schools play a much bigger role in your training than they would if they were just offering a school placement for a university PGCE. Our school staff are involved in interviewing, selecting and training you. They deliver all of the programme content and you will have all your curriculum conferences hosted by our partner schools, where the best teachers and professionals will be deployed to teach you everything they know. Our curriculum is modern, up to date and relevant, meaning that we are training teachers with the skills and expertise which our schools need now. Our trainee employment rates are testament to this!

When can I apply?

All applications are via UCAS Teacher Training and for 2018-19 are now open. Do apply early for popular subjects! We will close to applications once our places are full.

Do I need to get school experience before I apply?

It is important that you have some recent (within 2 years) and relevant (secondary) school experience before you apply. You need to know what the job involves – we have all been pupils, but a good teacher makes it look easy, and you need to find out what it is really like to be a teacher! Observing is fine – we do not expect you to have taught whole classes.

It is really difficult to get school experience – what can I do?

Look out for the Department for Education School Experience Programme or contact us directly. If you are still at university see if you can do any enrichment or modules which involve spending time in a school. If you are taking a year out between completing your degree and applying for ITT it is a great idea to spend some time working as a teaching assistant or cover supervisor – this experience will help you enormously once you start the programme.

"Trainees are extremely positive about the support and guidance that they receive from their subject mentors. One trainee said of his mentors: ‘They are just fantastic – always ahead of the game – always there for you. I couldn’t speak more highly of them.’ Another trainee really valued their ongoing support and expertise, saying: ‘They are really experienced and know what they are talking about.’ ... A recent audit of subject mentors’ expertise shows that they have a wide range of skills and experience and it is clear that trainees benefit enormously from this." OFSTED

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